Home biography INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT EDDY OKETCH, THE MAN WHO SHOKE RAILA IN MIGORI

INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT EDDY OKETCH, THE MAN WHO SHOKE RAILA IN MIGORI

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Migori County senator aspirant Eddy Oketch has conceded defeat to senator elect Ochillo Ayacko.

Ayacko garnered 85,234 votes to beat eddy Oketch of the Federal Party of Kenya who garnered 60,555 votes. In his concession speech, the 27 year old stated that on Monday he lodged complaints with the IEBC and the media about the invasion of the elections by “non-Migori ODM leaders.”

EDDY OKETCH BIOGRAPHY ,CV AND FAMILY

Eddy was born as the seventh child in a struggling family of eight siblings and grew up in my underdeveloped village of Mang’ong’o in Migori District of Kenya.

After his mother’s death, Eddy was forced to drop out of school to provide for his younger siblings, working side jobs including working on tobacco farms, in backstreet canteens as a dish-washer and as a garbage collector, earning meager wages so that he could buy food for his family

Eddy oketch grew up in rural Migori, and while from a loving and well-meaning family, he knew the hardships of so many Migorians—including early teen years spent surviving on the streets.  Through hard work and the remarkable generosity of the community, Eddy made his way to Friends School Kamusinga, African Leadership Academy in Johannesburg, Trinity College in the United States, and eventually Yale University where he graduated with a Masters in Global Affairs. It is his goal to help the community provide similar opportunities to hardworking residents that he was lucky enough to receive.

In the 2007/2008 post-election violence, Eddy oketch founded Ongoza, an organization committed to bringing an end to civil violence by empowering young people to become economically independent and champions of peace in their local communities. Ongoza is now an independent institution continuing to strengthen youth across Kenya. As a result of his groundbreaking work, Eddy has been recognized with the 2012 Impact Award from the Kenyan US Diaspora, the 2013 Africa Village’s Top 30 Under 30 Most Inspirational Young People on the African continent and Salt’s 2015 top 30 under 30 most innovative and influential youth in Africa.

Eddy oketch is also the Founder and Trustee of The Oketch Gicheru Trust, a foundation that offers education scholarships and digital mentorship to gifted and disadvantaged youth in Kenya. In the community, he serves in the Boards of Ulanda Girls High and St. Pauls Omboo Secondary, where he is leading infrastructural development.

Eddy is certified in FX Education from Singapore’s Oanda Pacific. He is a member of the African Leadership Network, and a trained UNESCO International Youth Peace Ambassador. Additionally, Eddy was the youngest speaker and first panel leader at the 2012 G8 Summit and the first Africa cohort of the British Council Global Changemakers. He was in the select Equity Bank’s CEO’s task force that restructured the Bank’s Pre-University Program in 2009 and consulted as the first Think Tank on youth engagement strategy for the MasterCard Foundation’s head office in Toronto Canada, in 2011. He was also part of the professional committee that structured and established the 2nd Kenyan Prime Minister’s Youth Round Table in 2010. As part of the small Changemakers’ advisory group invited by the President of Mozambique, H.E. Amando Guebuza, he consulted for the Presidency on structuring youth employment and entrepreneurship promotion strategy in 2010. He became the youth representative and member of the CEO Roundtable that brought together CEOs and policy makers of top Kenyan and regional companies and principal government decision makers from key sectors of the economy to deliberate on national and regional issues emerging from the World Economy Forum’s Global Competitiveness Report 2010-2011.

MESSAGE FROM EDDY OKETCH

 

  • Eddy has participated in leading conferences around the globe including the World Economic Forum, the 2012 Clinton Global Initiative, and the G8 Summit, where he was a panel leader.
  • He is currently pursuing a Master’s degree at Yale’s Institute for Global Affairs

 

Hitorically youth political leadership has largely been discounted. However, nothing in today’s Kenya could be of greater significance. From biblical Joseph and David to Alexander the Great to today’s Malala, the experience question is often introduced to temper the ambitions and passions of young, aspiring leaders. But in fact the stories of these young leaders demonstrate that what truly matters is not age but clarity of purpose, a holistic sense of society and an understanding of disparate cultural and personal experiences. These are the hallmarks of impactful leadership.

I have traversed many villages and visited many homes in Migori. I still do so. I have continually learned of families forced to do more with close to nothing. When I was younger, this is what I saw in my family as well. Like many struggling Migori families, we had aspirations for a good life, for happiness, and for success. As a young boy however, I thought of my family as conceivably among the most disadvantaged lots in Kenya. This was a reflection of my narrow exposure, restricted to my little village in Migori. Many times that limited perspective had me thinking that other families in the county had much more, and led much better lives. As I grew older, struggled in the backstreets and benefited from the kindness of foster families in Migori, I realized there were quite a number of families just like mine. I have seen most of the problems I have lived reflected in many girls and boys who look just like me in Migori.

“I have traversed many villages and visited many homes in Migori. I still do so. I have continually learned of families forced to do more with close to nothing. When I was younger, I saw this in my family as well. Like many struggling Migori families, we had aspirations for a good life, for happiness, and for success.”

My story is a story of many young people in Migori, with only one profound difference; many generous people have given me the opportunities and tools to succeed. My responsibility is now to give back to others in our community. The government, with fresh leaders and new ideas, can play a significant equalizing role. In the past this has not been the case. Instead, the public sector has served as an egocentric enterprise for politicians, where they rise to quick wealth at the expense of our community. This reinforces artificial poverty among our people. While I have had opportunities to acquire the best education and could choose to work across the world in order to build materially a better life for myself, watching the structural poverty in Migori calls instead for me to choose a life of public service. My mother always taught me that our obligations to help others are our highest calling. The talents and potential I see in Migori’s youth and women are a constant reminder of why those obligations to our larger society matter. The choice of public service is a leap of faith in our community, a profoundly held belief that the ultimate calling is a duty to our people.

eddy oketch

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