Home bible teachings HOW SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST(SDA) CHURCH STARTED.

HOW SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST(SDA) CHURCH STARTED.

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The Seventh-day Adventist Church ( SDA church) is a Protestant Christian denomination which is distinguished by its observance of Saturday, the seventh day of the week in Christian and Jewish calendars, as the Sabbath, and its emphasis on the imminent Second Coming (advent) of Jesus Christ. The denomination grew out of the Millerite movement in the United States during the mid-19th century and it was formally established in 1863. Among its founders was Ellen G. White, whose extensive writings are still held in high regard by the church.

The Seventh-day Adventist Church is the largest of several Adventist groups which arose from the Millerite movement of the 1840s in upstate New York, a phase of the Second Great Awakening. William Miller predicted on the basis of Daniel 8:14–16 and the “day-year principle” that Jesus Christ would return to Earth between the spring of 1843 and the spring of 1844. In the summer of 1844, Millerites came to believe that Jesus would return on October 22, 1844, understood to be the biblical Day of Atonement for that year. Miller’s failed prediction became known as the “Great Disappointment”.

Hiram Edson and other Millerites came to believe that Miller’s calculations were correct, but that his interpretation of Daniel 8:14 was flawed as he assumed Christ would come to cleanse the world. These Adventists came to the conviction that Daniel 8:14 foretold Christ’s entrance into the Most Holy Place of the heavenly sanctuary rather than his Second Coming. Over the next few decades this understanding of a sanctuary in heaven developed into the doctrine of the investigative judgment, an eschatological process that commenced in 1844, in which every person would be judged to verify their eligibility for salvation and God’s justice will be confirmed before the universe. This group of Adventists continued to believe that Christ’s Second Coming would continue to be imminent, however they resisted setting further dates for the event, citing Revelation 10:6, “that there should be time no longer.

The Seventh-day Adventist Church is the largest of several Adventist groups which arose from the Millerite movement of the 1840s in upstate New York, a phase of the Second Great Awakening. William Miller predicted on the basis of Daniel 8:14–16 and the “day-year principle” that Jesus Christ would return to Earth between the spring of 1843 and the spring of 1844. In the summer of 1844, Millerites came to believe that Jesus would return on October 22, 1844, understood to be the biblical Day of Atonement for that year. Miller’s failed prediction became known as the “Great Disappointment”.

Hiram Edson and other Millerites came to believe that Miller’s calculations were correct, but that his interpretation of Daniel 8:14 was flawed as he assumed Christ would come to cleanse the world. These Adventists came to the conviction that Daniel 8:14 foretold Christ’s entrance into the Most Holy Place of the heavenly sanctuary rather than his Second Coming.

Over the next few decades this understanding of a sanctuary in heaven developed into the doctrine of the investigative judgment, an eschatological process that commenced in 1844, in which every person would be judged to verify their eligibility for salvation and God’s justice will be confirmed before the universe. This group of SDA church continued to believe that Christ’s Second Coming would continue to be imminent, however they resisted setting further dates for the event, citing Revelation 10:6, “that there should be time no longer

For about 20 years, the SDA church movement consisted of a small, loosely knit group of people who came from many churches and whose primary means of connection and interaction was through James White’s periodical The Advent Review and Sabbath Herald. They embraced the doctrines of the Sabbath, the heavenly sanctuary interpretation of Daniel 8:14, conditional immortality, and the expectation of Christ’s premillennial return. Among its most prominent figures were Joseph Bates, James White, and Ellen G. White. Ellen White came to occupy a particularly central role; her many visions and spiritual leadership convinced her fellow SDA church that she possessed the gift of prophecy.[citation needed]
Seventh-day Adventist Church in Takoma Park, Maryland.

The church was formally established in Battle Creek, Michigan, on May 21, 1863, with a membership of 3,500.[5] The denominational headquarters were later moved from Battle Creek to Takoma Park, Maryland, where they remained until 1989. The General Conference headquarters then moved to its current location in Silver Spring, Maryland.

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